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Black Chronicle article 5/16/08  
http://news.mywebpal.com/partners/356/public/news902813.html


One the first African-Americans to Re-enter.....  
One the first African-Americans to Re-enter the Oklahoma Legislature, Curtis L. Lawson Dies at Age 72.

In 1965, Curtis L. Lawson was among the first of many African-Americans to re-enter the Oklahoma legislature after the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Friends and family converge in Tulsa to celebrate his life and contribution to Oklahoma History.

(PRWEB) May 1, 2008 -- Curtis Levern Lawson was born to Reverend Joe Lawson and Etta Perry Lawson on August 16, 1935 in Pine Bluff Arkansas. The Lord called him home to a place of peace and rest on April 24, 2008.

Curtis was a graduate of Merrill High School and after serving in the Air Force (11th airborne Div. 503rd abn inf Regiment) during the Korean conflict; he attended A.M&N College in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. In 1960, Curtis entered the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville to study law.

Curtis, his wife Laverne, and young son Michael moved to Tulsa in 1964. Soon after, he passed the Oklahoma bar exam and began his law practice. Curtis immediately became an active voice and participant in the civil rights movement and other community activities.

In 1965, Curtis Lawson became part of Oklahoma history when he was elected to the Oklahoma House of Representatives as the first African American to represent Tulsa. He served in that capacity until 1969.

Curtis was an active member of the NAACP, The North Tulsa Historical Society, and he enjoyed researching and studying the history of African Americans, Native Americans, and the human experience. A published author, Curtis was especially proud of the series of articles he wrote on the African Slave Trade for the Oklahoma Eagle, and his piece called "The Man in the Hole in the Wall" published in the Vintage News magazine.

Family and friends paid tribute to Curtis Lawson's life and contributions to Oklahoma history on April 30, 2008. Notable resolutions of condolences were from the City Council of Tulsa, Oklahoma Senator Judy Eason McIntyre and Representative Jabar Shumate.

Curtis L. Lawson will be laid to rest with military honors at Fort Gibson National Cemetery on May 2, 2008 12:00PM.

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See Press Release online.  http://www.prweb.com/releases/2008/05/prweb904974.htm
Special Request From The Family  
Donations can be made to the

J. Castina College Scholarship Fund
Of Paradise Baptist Church
507 E. King Street
Tulsa, Oklahoma 74106
(918) 584-6820

In Memory of
Curtis L. Lawson
Cherished Memories  
Curtis Levern Lawson was born to Reverend Joe Lawson and Etta Perry Lawson on August 16, 1935 in Pine Bluff Arkansas.
The Lord called him home to a place of peace and rest on April 24, 2008.

Curtis confessed hope in Christ at an early age at St. Bethel Baptist Church under the spiritual leadership of Reverend John Watson.

Curtis was a graduate of Merrill High School and after serving in the Air Force during the Korean conflict; he attended A.M&N College in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. In 1960, Curtis entered the University of Arkansas in Fayetville to study law.

Curtis, his wife Laverne, and young son Michael moved to Tulsa in 1964. Soon after, he passed the Oklahoma bar exam and began his law practice. Curtis immediately became an active voice and participant in the civil rights movement and other community activities. In November of that year, he and his wife joined in fellowship with the Paradise Baptist Church where Reverend J. Castina Jackson was the pastor.

In 1965, Curtis Lawson became part of Oklahoma history when he was elected to the Oklahoma House of Representatives and he served in that capacity until 1969.

Curtis was an active member of the NAACP, The North Tulsa Historical Society, and he enjoyed researching and studying the history of African Americans, Native Americans, and the human experience. A published author, Curtis was especially proud of the series of articles he wrote on the African Slave Trade for the Oklahoma Eagle, and his piece called “The Man in the Hole in the Wall” published in the Vintage News magazine.

Curtis’ s other passions were spending time with his children and other family members and going for scenic drives on Sunday afternoons and most any other day of the week.

He leaves to cherish his memories a devoted wife Laverne Ward Lawson, three children Michael Curtis Lawson, Dallas, TX, Cheryl Tracy Lawson, Riverside, CA, and Stanley Jon Lawson (Jessica), Tulsa, OK, Step-Mother O.T Lawson, Pine Bluff, AR. brother Rev. Eugene M. Lawson, Dallas, TX, two sisters Davenia Armstrong, Oswego, Il, Marietta (Amos) Coleman, Scottsdale, AZ and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and other relatives and friends who all will miss Curtis’s unique brand of humor, his graciousness, and charm.


Curtis was preceded in death by his father and mother, one sister, and two brothers.


Final Report of the Oklahoma Commission to Study  
Final Report of the Oklahoma Commission to Study The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921


http://www.tulsareparations.org/FinalReport.htm
Oklahoma Historical Society  
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/C/CI010.html
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